Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalists

7633 North Florida Avenue
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
352-465-4225






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Previous 2016 - 2017 Sunday Services




 07/02/17

The Unitarian Universalist Story

by Rev Richard Fewke



Jean McCauley read, with permission, an adapted sermon written by Rev. Richard Fewkes, Minister Emeritus at First Parish Bridgewater Unitarian Universalist Church in Bridgewater, MA. The sermon is entitled, “The Unitarian Universalist Story”. His sermon describes some well-known and some not so well-known Unitarians and Universalists, as well as the journey of Unitarian Universalists in America. 

Jean has been a UU since 1988. She was looking for a place for her boys to be “churched” and UU was recommended to her by a friend. She started attending the UU fellowship in Greenville, SC and learned, like many others, that she had been a UU all her life and just didn’t know it! Jean is a charter member of NCUU and believes wholeheartedly in maintaining and supporting a liberal religious tradition in Citrus County.




 Jean addressed the following

 Unitarian Universalist principles:


3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement
    to spiritual growth in our congregations

4. A free and responsible search for truth and
    meaning






06/25/17

Bill & Eli Perras










 06/18/17

Annual NCUU Choir Performance

Let us Sing/Say It With Music



Music has always been an integral part of every religious tradition. Music has a unique way of reaching people, of expressing feelings and ideas, of setting a tone of joy, sadness, and contemplation. Music has the unique power of achieving all this, with or without words. This was our annual NCUU Choir performance as we sang and expressed our UU principles in music.





06/11/17

 NCUU Annual Flower Service


The flowers given and received during this service served as metaphors for gifts we give to and receive from this beloved community. 

We were reminded of how we each serve our congregation in different ways and what we expect to gain from our membership. We are all different, as are the flowers, but together we make a beautiful bouquet.

Today’s special flower service addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person

3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our
    congregations




 

06/04/17

UU Rev Katie Culbert

After the Flood


Every ending is a new beginning. Through the grace of God, we can always start again.

Marianne Williamson

There have been many retellings of the Genesis story of Noah and the ark, including a blockbuster hit that was released in 2014. What insight does the story of a flood wiping out almost all of humankind provide us? How do we go on after the flood, after the loss?

Our guest minister today was Pastor Katherine “Katie” Culbert. Katie graduated with a Master of Divinity degree from Meadville Lombard Theological School. She is a Chaplain at Tampa General Hospital and lives with her husband JD and two children, Desi and Casey. Her passions are family ministry, Unitarian Universalist evangelism, social justice, worship arts and sparking the imagination of Unitarian Universalist leaders in thinking of bold new ways to create religious community and grow our faith.


UU Rev Culbert addressed our Unitarian Universalist principle:

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning




 05/28/17

Bonnie Whitehurst

Florida: Where the Sawgrass Meets the Sky


http://bonniewhitehurst.com/

Florida has been settled by many diverse cultures at different times in its history. This presentation will highlight peoples and events, memorializing them through narrative and music.

Bonnie is the music director of the Tarpon Springs Unitarian Universalist Church and is an organist, cantor and music teacher at Espiritu Santo Catholic Church in Safety Harbor, FL. She has 10 professional recordings and her own YouTube channel presenting her original songs with enhancing images.

Today Bonnie addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part






05/21/17

Kathryn Taubert

Member NCUU




 Solar:

Unlimited Energy for the Sunshine State

by Suwannee-St. John’s Sierra Club

Today’s presentation is an interactive, leader-led program that explains the importance of renewal energy sources to the health of our economy, environment, and the planet. Developed by members of the same team as the highly successful Water Works: Stand Up and Act Now! Solar’s feedback has been excellent. You will learn how solar and fossil fuel energy source differ; how solar saves money; helps the environment; types of solar systems; importance of the recent votes on solar Amendments in Florida, and how to get started determining if a solar system is right for you.

Kathryn Taubert, an NCUU member, also serves as Assistant Chair for the Suwannee-St. John’s Sierra Club covering 15½ counties in North Central Florida. She served in the role of instructional designer as well as a presenter for both the Water Works and Solar PowerPoint programs delivered to almost 1000 people throughout the SSJ region since 2015. She is active in a variety of Sierra Club programs designed to fulfill the Club’s mission of exploring, enjoying and protecting the planet. Kathryn is a published author, journalist, former management consultant for CIGNA and the Traveler’s Insurance Companies, was a professional fundraiser and developed the first corporate training program for the March of Dimes Defects Foundation. Her hobbies include SCUBA diving and long-distance swimming which led her to her current interest in the Sierra Club’s efforts to protect and preserve Florida’s water resources. Kathryn has also recorded two internationally recognized CDs of jazz/standards vocals. A self-proclaimed “chronic volunteer,” she moved to Rainbow Springs 5 years ago, becoming an active NCUU member almost 3 years ago.

Kathryn addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




 05/14/17
UU Rev Carole Yorke: Can You Live With Paradoxes?

Unitarian Universalist Minister

Can you identify the paradoxes in your life and determine how to live with them? Webster: a statement seemingly contrary or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true. We will look at what Arlie Russell Hochschild presents as the “Great Paradox” in “Strangers in Their Own Land.” She explores the central paradox of the lives of political activists in the heart of “cancer alley” in Louisiana. We will take what we can from what she learned and try to apply it to our lives.

UU Rev Carole Yorke has been a Unitarian Universalist minister in Florida since 1998. She has served the Spirit of Life UUs, UU Church in Stuart, and First UU Congregation of the Palm Beaches, but is now retired in Port St Lucie where she lives with her five beautiful Pomeranians. She loves coming to visit with Nature Coast UUs. An added activity recently has been yoga (where was this all my life?!?) Carole took another trip to Alaska this past summer, including a trip to Denali. "The Mountains are calling and I must go." John Muir.


Our friend Rev Carole addressed ALL seven of our Unitarian Universalist principles.



05/07/17


Peter Freeman: Life Fulfillment


Member of NCUU


Today's speaker addressed what we need to bring into our lives to make us happier and more fulfilled. How do we manifest the things we need to make us more fulfilled? Who should we be while we are manifesting these things?

Peter addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part





04/30/17


UU Rev Katy Korb


The Truth of the Matter




In these days of conspiracy theories and "alternative facts", and increased knowledge of how much our perceptions bias what we think or believe, how do we find the truth?

Rev. Kathleen Korb was born and raised in St. Petersburg, FL and attended Stetson University in DeLand, majoring in English and minoring in mathematics and education. She graduated from Harvard Divinity School and was ordained in Sharon, MA in 1979. She has served churches in New London, CT, Farmington Hills, MI, New Orleans, LA, Naples, FL and St. Petersburg where she retired in 2014. She is serving as president of the West Central Florida Cluster of Congregations and on the Tampa Bay Interfaith board.





04/23/17

 

Mindy Simmons


Dialogue!


What does that look like?

No more fighting!



http://www.mindysimmons.com/




Today we discussed the art of Dialogue as compared to and opposed to Debate and Argument. We learned what it means to dialogue with each other and thus be able to voice our concerns and opinions without anger.

Mindy has been a performing singer/songwriter for over 37 years. She has been a speaker in UU churches for 15 years. Mindy was first introduced to Unitarian Universalism back in 2002 at SUUSI, the Southeast Unitarian Universalist Summer Institute. She was instantly drawn to the seven principles as the key to rising above religious dogmas and finding common ground for all people!

Mindy Simmons addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large




04/16/17

UU Rev Rus Cooper-Dowda

O, Spirit of Life And Renewal: The Unitarian Universalist Easter

The sermon was a true (Walt) Whitman's Sampler of Unitarian Universalist thought on Easter and spring. This time the chocolates map was presented as a Reader's Theater of UU thought on Spring Life and Renewal – from StarHawk to the Koran to Mary Oliver to the Bible and back again via St. Francis of Assisi.

Rus was born in Montgomery, Alabama the same month Rosa Parks was arrested. She was raised as a missionary's kid and then a military dependent. She moved a lot. She's been a historian, a banker, a teacher, and a minister. She has degrees from Berea College, the State University of New York in Albany, the Starr King School For the Ministry and McDonald's Hamburger University.

Today's sermon addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




04/09/17






04/02/17

Rev Dr Fred Howard

The Make-Believe World of Religion

The title of this sermon sounds a bit irreverent, but there is a sound theological basis to the idea of religion as play. Cultural theorists and anthropologists have noted with fascination the elements of human behavior that make us playful are also those that make religion possible. Religion only fulfills its purpose when it functions as a sort of sacred play.

Rev. Dr. Fred Howard has roots deep in Georgia soil. He was born and raised in Macon, attended Valdosta State College and then the Medical College of Georgia, and practiced medicine as a family physician in Cairo and Douglas for twenty years. In 2002 he heard the call to ministry and closed his medical practice, moved to Atlanta, and began studies at Candler School of Theology. After graduation in 2006, he spent a year in the Clinical Pastoral Education program at Emory Hospital. For the past eight years Fred has served as minister of the Valdosta UU Church. He also continues to work part time in the medical field as an emergency room physician.

Fred has special interests in contemplative spirituality, mind body medicine, and interfaith and intercultural exchange. He is author of Transforming Faith: Stories of Change from a Lifelong Spiritual Seeker, recipient of numerous awards including the coveted Nautilus Book Award. Kirkus Reviews called it “a profound, moving take on faith in an age that often vehemently challenges it.”

Most recently, Fred published his first novel, “Children of Covenant.”  This suspenseful story offers some unique perspectives on Southern prejudices around two of the most oppressed minorities in our culture, gays and Muslims.

Rev Dr Fred addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations





03/26/17

Dan Gribbin

The Meaning of a Life

We aspire to find meaning in our lives, but what, exactly, are the factors that contribute to a meaningful life for each of us? To answer that question, today’s speaker will draw upon his own experience of his grandmother's life and upon the life of a man who spent seven years in solitary confinement, where he did discover the direction for a meaningful life. Viktor Frankl's notion of three approaches to meaning lies at the heart of this talk.


Dan Gribbin retired from college teaching after 37 years. He spent the bulk of his career as professor of English at Ferrum College in Virginia, teaching writing, film, and a variety of literature courses. During the past decade, he has taught African-American Literature and American Literature at the University of Central Florida. He and his wife Martha live in Daytona Beach Shores and are members of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Ormond Beach. Shore bird photography, songwriting, and grand parenting are Dan's most important retirement activities, not necessarily in that order.



Check out his beautiful

Shore Bird Note Cards at

www.danbirds.com

 Hear his music at

dangribbin.com







03/19/17

UU Rev Bob Murphy

The 2020 Vision



What's the good news that Unitarian Universalist bring to America? How can we be helpful? The next four years will make or break the Unitarian Universalist movement. Will we face new challenges or will we fade into history? Rev. Murphy will discuss the here-and-now reality of liberal religion

Bob Murphy is a visionary. He's a senior Unitarian Universalist minister who helps to create successful congregations. Rev. Murphy is the parish minister for the Unitarian Universalist church in Tarpon Springs.

His sermon today addressed all of our Unitarian Universalist principles.





03/12/17

UU Rev Roy Sniffen

What Is Truth? Ver. 2.1

We live in interesting times. “Fact-checking” seems to be a growth industry and in some minds it seems obligatory to present “alternate facts” to contradict whatever one's opponents may say. Yet, it's written in the Bible, “Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.” (John 8:32) and a more modern voice – Sen. Patrick Moynihan – thought “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” In light of such things as the “Bowling Green Massacre” and so many repetitions of other disputable “facts” can we still treat each person we meet as a companion to join on life's path? Must we? Let's take a look at capital “T” Truth over the ages and how it may inform our interactions today.

A recovering New Yorker, Roy Sniffen has a Master of Divinity degree from Starr King School of the Ministry in Berkeley, CA and studied at the late, lamented Bangor Theological Seminary. While in seminary he founded and operated the eWorld Religions and Spiritualties Forum for Apple Co. In other phases of life, Rev. Roy has been an award-winning newspaper reporter, a congressional lobbyist, and a chemical dependency counselor. He lives in St. Petersburg, FL with a housemate, two dogs and two cats.

Rev Roy addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




03/05/17

Zackery Cote

Experiencing “The Other” Through Literature



The purpose of today’s presentation is to enlighten the congregation about the benefits of literature in regards to shared experience. The presentation will focus on Zora Neale Hurston, a female, African-American author. She was a remarkable forward-thinker who was also was unflinching in her desire to portray the lives of African-Americans of her time through the eyes of those living them. In a world that is continuing to seek shelter from foreign perspectives, rather than embrace them, Zora’s writings offer a tiny glimpse into what we can learn about ourselves and our fellow man through literature.


Zackery Cote is an instructor at the College of Central Florida. He received his Master’s Degree in Creative Writing from the University of Tampa, where he was privileged to attend various seminars presented by a diverse range of authors from diverse cultural perspectives. His short story, “The Cracks in Our Armor” was published in Persona, the Literary Magazine of Texas State University. He teaches English composition courses at the College of Central Florida, encouraging incoming freshman to share their own diverse experiences through writing and receive the experiences of others through reading.








02/26/17

Elaine Silver
 
The Only Real Power

"There is a Power for Good in the Universe, and you can use it." Quotation by Ernest Holmes, founder and author of The Science of Mind book and philosophy. Long time Science of Mind student and Practitioner, Rev. Elaine Silver shares different perspectives on the concept of Power, and punctuates them with songs that relate to these concepts. The talk and music allow an experiential understanding that is designed to open the heart and mind to our Oneness.  "Love is the only real power in the Universe."


www.elainesilver.com

“Rev. Faerie” Elaine Silver is a seasoned and consummate musician. She is an accomplished singer, songwriter, touring and recording artist with 20 CDs to date and counting. She is well-known in her original home state as “The Folk Music Queen of New Jersey,” and since moving to Florida in 2000, she has developed her passion of metaphysics into a Musical Ministry. She often fills in for ministers on Sunday mornings at Unity Churches, Centers for Spiritual Living, Unitarian Centers and other progressive churches as she teaches and shares Truth Principles Through Song. Elaine Silver utilizes love, humor and a sprinkling of magic to convey musical messages that bring the listeners to an exalted and receptive place of the heart and mind. She has extensive training in the Science of Mind principles and has completed and continues course work for Practitioner from Centers for Spiritual Living. She is also an ordained Priestess in the Temple of Isis in Geyserville, California and an award-winning performer.

Elaine addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another & encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations 4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part









02/19/17

UU Rev Rus Cooper-Dowda

How to Get Here from There:
The Road from Trafford, Alabama to Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists

How does the child of Klan members grow up to become a liberal minister? How did that angry male God trying to trip her up become her meditations about "The Weaver At The Loom?" And, what about her common "Aha!" moment when she realized becoming a Unitarian Universalist was truly coming home?

Rus was born in Montgomery, Alabama the same month Rosa Parks was arrested. She was raised as a missionary's kid and then a military dependent. She moved a lot. She's been a historian, a banker, a teacher, and a minister. She has degrees from Berea College, the State University of New York in Albany, the Starr King School For the Ministry and McDonald's Hamburger University.

Rev Rus addressed all of our  Unitarian Universalist principles.





02/12/17

Dr Kyaein O. Conner

The Spiritual Benefit
 of
Culturally Based Activities
http://www.kuumbadance.com/



Today we had a truly exceptional inspiring, entertaining, uplifting and educational presentation! "Dr Kya" focused on the fact that all of us can benefit from culturally based activities; even if those activities are not part of our own culture. Dr. Conner shared some examples of culturally based activities that are particularly relevant for spiritual growth and development. She also addressed how maintaining ones culture of origin has significant self-protective properties for health and wellness. This suggests that we should be celebrating and recognizing differences as opposed to trying to look at the world with a lens of all people are the same. She used African dance and drumming as a more complete example as she expertly guided the congregation through a simple African chant, movements and rhythmic exercises. After a brief break, she and her fellow performers provided a demonstration of outstanding West African dancing and drumming.

Dr. Kyaien Conner is a professor of cultural diversity and mental health at the University of South Florida in the College of Behavioral and Community Sciences and is a professor of West African Dance at the University of Tampa in the School of Dance. Dr. Conner has presented her work on cultural competence and health disparities facing the African American community all over the country as well as internationally. Her research has been published in well-respected academic journals and text books. Dr. Conner has studied West African dance and its physical, psychological and spiritual benefits for over a decade and has traveled to Africa on multiple occasions to gain a better understanding of the true meaning behind West African drum, dance and song.


Click HERE for more information
about the outstanding KUUMBA Dancers and Drummers



Dr. Conner addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all




02/05/17

Peter Freeman, Member NCUU
Spiritual But Not Religious

Our speaker’s personal journey toward finding the meaning of being spiritual, but not religious. Peter Freeman is a Welsh engineering graduate from London University who came to the states 40 years ago. He worked at Proctor and Gamble for 35 years managing the people that designed the machines making Pampers and Luvs baby diapers. They built diaper plants all over the world! In retirement he went to "Coach For Life" coaching school and graduated as a life coach in 2000. He practiced life coaching on a not for profit basis until 2010. His hobbies in retirement include flying, sailing, scuba diving, hiking, and traveling the world. He is currently teaching a class called "Life Fulfillment" at Master The Possibilities, the learning center at On Top of the World. Peter and his partner Sue, both members of NCUU, have been together for 14 years.


Peter addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another & encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part





01/29/17

How God Became Good

by Tom Hibberd

Member NCUU




Today’s service was a brief discussion about God including references to both the Old Testament and the New Testament. Tom examined the question of how the Judeo-Christian God evolved from mass murderer to the God of love. We all experienced a view of the Bible as never seen or heard before!

Dr. Tom Hibberd has been a clinical psychologist for 36 years and is currently practicing in Inverness. His undergraduate degree is in anthropology with an emphasis on the cultural anthropology of religion. He has a lifelong interest in ancient history and the history of religion in Western civilization.




01/15/17
Rev Gayle Reuter

A World that Works for Everyone

The Communities for Spiritual Living hold as our common vision A World that Works for Everyone. We use our individual community based values and resources in support of this vision. We encourage self-awareness and personal spiritual growth for each of our members and we support them in building their own personal dreams and participating in the larger vision.

Originally from Evanston, IL, Rev Reuter moved to California and was introduced to Religious Science, the teachings of the Communities for Spiritual Living, in 1984. She attended the School of Ministry and Leadership and became an ordained minister in 1995. She accepted a call in Wilmington, Delaware and served there as senior minister until retiring in 2013. She is now the staff minister in charge of Pastoral Care and Spiritual Leadership Team at the Ocala Center for Spiritual Living. In addition, Rev Reuter teaches classes, participates in Toastmasters, serves in the World Ministry of Prayer and is working on producing meditation CDs. On a personal note, she has three grown children and lives happily with her little dog, Emma.





01/08/17
Vijayan Nair: Hinduism

What is Hinduism? Is it a religion of faith or way of life?

Vijayan Nair has been serving the youth of Tampa Bay through public speaking, leadership and skill development programs. He pioneered the Toastmasters youth leadership program in Tampa bay from his home for the first batch. Over the past 9 years his outreach has covered at least 600 youth and adults. He is currently President of Malayalee Association of Tampa and Vice President of the Federation of Indian Associations.

A former Lt Governor of Marketing for New York/ New Jersey Toastmasters, Vijay was the Toastmaster of the year for 2005 (New York – New Jersey area). Vijay has two masters degrees, one in Project Management and Master in Business Administration and Finance. Vijay has been teaching Entrepreneurship, Marketing and Financial Management at Keiser University before becoming the Academic Dean in the year



01/01/17
Rev Kalen Fristad
Universalism Today: Reflections of a Traveling Universalist

In his thirteen years of traveling around the country and speaking on universalism in many different kinds of churches and to other groups, today’s speaker has found that universalism is alive and well today. Indeed, the rise in the teaching of universalism is a very significant spiritual movement in the world at this time. In this message, Rev Fristad shared many significant and exciting things that are happening around the world today related to the teaching of universalism.

Rev. Kalen Fristad has been a United Methodist minister for more than 40 years, is a member of the Unitarian Universalist Christian Fellowship, and is President of the Christian Universalist Association. He traveled the country full time with his wife, Darlene, from 2003 to 2006 accepting invitations to speak at churches, countering the teaching that many people will suffer for eternity in hell and proclaiming the hopeful message of universalism. Following then, he served churches in Iowa half time, while spending half time on the road. He retired from the parish ministry in 2013, but continues to travel the country speaking on universalism. Over the years he has spoken at more than 200 UU churches. 




Kalen has written a book on universalism,
entitled DESTINED FOR SALVATION:
God’s Promise to Save Everyone,
and a Study Book with the same title.

His books, CDs and DVDs will be available for purchase after the service.





12/25/16

Pam Ricker

Giving of Our Gifts




As Winston Churchill once said, “We make a life by what we give.” And we all have some sort of gift that we can give, some talent or skill we are able to share to make our community and the world a better place. Working together for a common goal brings us closer to each other while providing essential services to the whole. This is a time of the year when we are thinking of gift giving and it seems a good time to bring to mind the sometimes intangible gifts that our fellow members contribute all year ‘round. The “Giving of Our Gifts Service” demonstrated how our members serve and support our beloved community here at NCUU.

This Giving of Our Gifts Service will address the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations






12-18-16

Joan Burnett


 Luminescence


a Unitarian Universalist holiday


Luminescence

Today's service was created as a distinctly Unitarian Universalist holiday. It honors the many paths our faith offers for attaining spiritual fulfillment and to celebrate the freedom our faith provides each individual in seeking their own personal truth.

We celebrated our own religion’s wonderful, distinctive identity




12/11/16

UU Rev Brock Leach: A Personal Theory of Change


As the world gets more interconnected and all the complexity of modern living becomes inescapable, it's hard to know where to focus our lives. How do we find integrity amidst all the problems and opportunities competing for our attention? How do we know that our lives matter? Organizations that tackle big, complicated problems develop a “theory of change” that they can prove works on a small scale. They experiment with different approaches until they learn which make a difference and then they apply them consistently to help address the larger problem. What’s the theory of change that guides your life?


Brock Leach is a UU minister working to advance social justice and social entrepreneurship. He currently serves as an executive consultant to the UUA for its Multi-faith Futures initiative and has helped develop and lead its Entrepreneurial Ministry program in partnership with the UU Ministers Association. Prior to that, Leach was vice-president of mission, strategy and innovation for UUSC where he helped create and launch the UU College of Social Justice, Commit2Respond, a UU-wide campaign for Climate Justice, and UUSC’s Justice-Building Program.




Leach has extensive non-profit leadership experience, having served on the board organizations such as YMCA, Habitat for Humanity Sarasota, and Children First, Sarasota County’s Head Start agency.  Internationally, he serves on the boards of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute and Mavuno Congo and is a coach for the Global Good Fund’s fellowship program for social entrepreneurs.  Prior to ministry, Brock had a 24-year career as an executive for PepsiCo and served as the company’s Chief Innovation Officer. He received his BA in economics from the University of Colorado Boulder, his MBA in finance and marketing from the University of Chicago, and his Master of Divinity degree from Meadville Lombard Theological School.




12/04/16

Gaia & Kurtland Davies: Putting the Heart in Community


We all need community. But it is hard to find in our busy, crazy society. Most of us look to our UU congregation for community for social contact, belonging, acknowledgement, learning opportunities, being of service, and receiving support in times of need. Community doesn’t just happen. It takes some work, and a lot of heart. Gaia and Kurtland shared with us some of their experiences with community and heart-work.



Between them, Gaia and Kurtland Davies have four master’s degrees and a PhD in psychology and counseling, but everything they need to know about community, they learned from living in the real world! Sometimes it has been fun and easy, sometimes it has been rough, but it has always been interesting. During the last nine years of Kurtland’s professional life he worked as a counselor/teacher in an alternative high school where he ran small groups and learned, sometimes the hard way, about creating and maintaining healthy communities. Since then Kurtland and Gaia have co-led successful groups and workshops of various stripes: Green Sanctuary, dreamwork, relationship conflict, personal growth, parenting, learning styles, environment and ecology. Come hear them share about the wonderful, weird and wacky world of community.


The Davies’ will address the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations

5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large





11/20/16

UU Rev Carole Yorke: Manna From Heaven

What an interesting image to reflect upon for Thanksgiving when we take stock of what we are grateful for in this creation of ours. Ancient Jewish scripture, the 16th chapter of the book of Exodus, tells how the Israelites survived their 40 years in the wilderness after escaping slavery in Egypt. Let's take a deeper look at the spiritual metaphor that we ignore at our peril.

Rev Carole Yorke has been a Unitarian Universalist minister in Florida since 1998. She has served the Spirit of Life UUs, UU Church in Stuart, and First UU Congregation of the Palm Beaches, but is now retired in Port St Lucie where she lives with her five beautiful Pomeranians. She loves coming to visit with Nature Coast UUs. She shares that an added activity recently has been yoga (where was this all my life?!?)  Carole took another trip to Alaska this summer, including a trip to Denali. "The Mountains are calling and I must go." John Muir

UU Rev Carole addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning







11/13/16

Lynne Westmoreland

Positive Disintegration:

Falling Apart for the Greater Good


Joanna Macy uses the term positive disintegration to describe the process of allowing our old belief systems and world views to crumble in order to look squarely, compassionately, and fearlessly at our current situation. Lynne invited us to look at the power of letting our hearts be broken open so that we might begin to heal ourselves and, by extension, the world.

Lynne Westmoreland has been a UU for over 30 years and a Buddhist for 15. After a 30 year career in music, she returned to graduate school to study humane education. Humane education looks at the interconnectedness of all of our global challenges and provides tools and hope for our ability to “be the change we wish to see in the world.” Lynne is currently online faculty for the Institute for Humane Education and works with individuals and congregations on solving our most pressing issues of social justice, animal protection, and environmental protection and stewardship.

Lynne addressed all seven of our Unitarian Universalist principles in a holistic way.




Edie in Real Life



11/06/16

Edythe Reid


Brown Sugar in the Congregation



Edie in Costume


Being White in the Black Lives Matter movement, what do you say to people of color when you go to support them? This workshop was presented at the Unitarian Universalist Association General Assembly in June 2016. It was very informative, even for a person of color and our speaker will happily share some of what she learned with the congregation.


Edythe Bernice Osborne Reid, affectionately known to us as Edie, is our speaker today. Although now a “Friend” of the NCUU, Edie has been and still is a Unitarian Universalist for almost four years. She has represented us at the quarterly West Central Cluster meetings and happily served as a Nature Coast delegate at the General Assembly for three consecutive years. Prior to becoming a Unitarian Universalist, she taught children’s bible study in the Southern Baptist church from 2006-2012. Edie say her passions once were baking and cooking. However, as she entered her sixties the arthritis took over her fingers thus limiting her chopping, dicing and mixing skills. Known as a person who makes lemonade out of lemons, she currently is devoting her culinary skills to doing Caribbean food research and writing food related articles on her findings in her upcoming blog simply titled “Caribbean Culinary Writings.” A caregiver by nature she finds fulfillment in making sure everyone around her is happy and content. When asked why she is always smiling she says, “I have never met a stranger and besides, I do not know if I will ever see you again. So why not we be happy and make today count.”

E.D. addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning




10/30/16

NCUU Players:
Let's Celebrate the On-Going Story of the Unitarian Universalists!

The theme of this alternative order of service, called a "Celebration Service," was the past, present and future of Unitarian Universalism. We enjoyed lots of fun music, while pondering some hard questions about where we've been, where we are now and where we go from here. We had an interesting Discussion/Talk-Back to share our opinions on the day's "celebration". 

This service was developed in response to the requests from members of the congregation to try an alternative form of service from time to time. Members of the NCUU Players, the choir and musicians from the congregation presented the service, the content for which Jo Darling was responsible. The NCUU Players is a group of NCUU members who are willing to lend their various talents from time to time to enrich and spice up services.


The NCUU Players addressed our fourth Unitarian Universalist principle

A free and responsible search for truth and meaning




10/23/16

UU Rev Mary Louise DeWolf: Joining in the Journey

Memories of our lives are the foundation on which our future is built. Looking back helps us understand why we are the way we are, and to choose the way forward that we want to go. What effect did our religion have on our choices? The same goes for our congregation. From 1998 to 2016 and beyond, how do we want NCUU to continue to grow and serve the members of our community?
                                                                             


The Reverend Mary Louise DeWolf is a second generation native Floridian. After receiving her BS in Science Education and Master of Education from the University of Florida, she spent thirty-three years teaching biology and chemistry in the public schools of Florida, Georgia, California, England and the Florida Community College in Jacksonville. This was followed by eight years as a Co-District Executive in the Florida and Mid-South Districts of the Unitarian Universalist Association. During this time Rev. DeWolf began her preparation for ministry. She later received a MA in Religious Studies at the University of South Florida and Final Fellowship from the Unitarian Universalist Association. She served as part-time minister at Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists in Citrus Springs, Florida for seven years, retired from ministry in 2010, and was awarded Minister Emerita. Reverend Mary Louise lives in Crystal River, FL.  She lost her husband, Bob Campbell, to cancer December 19, 2015. Bob was a charter member of NCUU.



               

Mary Louise's sermon addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning




10/16/16

Kathy Moyles: Journey to Maturity

Today’s speaker shared her various religious experiences from childhood to becoming a Unitarian Universalist in late adulthood. She described her journey from being Protestant, to Catholic, to joining a Carmelite religious order for seven years and finally, finding Unitarian Universalism.

Kathy grew up Florida’s Space Coast. She worked as an aerospace contract worker for five years and then joined a Carmelite order in St Louis, MO for eight years. She moved to Citrus County in 1982 and after completing her nursing training worked in geriatric settings for almost 40 years, including 27 years as a nurse at Brentwood Retirement Center. She retired in 2014.                                                    


Kathy addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part







10/09/16

UU Rev Dr Fred Howard


Love and Zen:
Weaving the Tapestry of Our Lives






Unitarian Universalists have such diverse communities. What is it that binds us together? Visitors from more traditional, creed based churches often wonder how a congregation with such varied beliefs and so many differing individual spiritual practices can ever hope to find unity. That we’ve managed, for the most part, to achieve this unity can seem rather mysterious, even to those of us that have been around awhile. Zen has some wisdom to offer us, I think, as we seek to understand the dynamics of our community. Today’s speaker will share some thoughts on this from his recent reread of Pirsig’s classic “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” that may be of use to us as we continue to stretch ourselves in incorporating newcomers, broadening our diversity, and strengthening the ties that bind.

Rev. Dr. Fred Howard has roots deep in Georgia soil. He was born and raised in Macon, attended Valdosta State College and then the Medical College of Georgia, and practiced medicine as a family physician in Cairo and Douglas for twenty years. In 2002 he heard the call to ministry and closed his medical practice, moved to Atlanta, and began studies at Candler School of Theology. After graduation in 2006, he spent a year in the Clinical Pastoral Education program at Emory Hospital. For the past eight years Fred has served as minister of the Valdosta UU Church. He also continues to work part time in the medical field as an emergency room physician. Fred has special interests in contemplative spirituality, mind body medicine, and interfaith and intercultural exchange. He is author of Transforming Faith: Stories of Change from a Lifelong Spiritual Seeker, recipient of numerous awards including the coveted Nautilus Book Award. Kirkus Reviews called it “a profound, moving take on faith in an age that often vehemently challenges it.”

Rev Howard addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations




10/02/16 The Sunday Service Committee asked the congregation to display their talents. Some people sang, danced, or played a musical instrument. Others are cleaver with their hands or have literary talents and created poetry and/or wrote essays. Some shared their abilities to paint or sculpt, write music, take beautiful photos, or create art with wood. We at NCUU believe all talent is a gift that we develop from birth to old age and were happy to share those talents this Sunday.



09/25/16 UU Rev Marni Harmony: Diving Deep into the Dark


Darkness in our culture has become overladen with a connection to negativity and even evil. How might spending in time in darkness contribute to our spiritual growth?

Ordained in 1974, Marni served churches in State College, PA and Brookfield, WI before being called to Orlando, FL, where she served for 20 years. She then enjoyed two wonderful Interim ministries in Marietta, GA and Tarpon Springs, FL. A UU since age 7, Marni received her B.A. from Tufts University; a ThM from Boston University School of Theology; an MSW from the University of Wisconsin and a DMin from Columbia Seminary. She has worked as a hospital chaplain, a college chaplain, and a psychotherapist, as well as being a VISTA volunteer. Though formally “retired,” she currently serves on the UUA Retirement Plan Committee as a Compensation Consultant, serves as a member of the Ministerial Transition Team for the Southern Region, and is Vice President of the UU Retired Ministers and Partners Association. She makes her home in Orlando with her spouse Nancy, cat Zeke, and dogs Finn and Chester. She eats lots of vegetables, loves the Irish whistle.




Rev Marni addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




09/18/16

Doug Worthington: We All Have Two Lives

By facing our own mortality, our lives become more meaningful and purposeful. Today’s speaker explained how we typically deny our own mortality. In spite of the subject matter of this sermon, the message is positive and powerful.

Doug Worthington has been an active member of the UU Fellowship of Marion County since becoming a member in 2008. He chairs the Sunday Service Committee and is the coordinator for the communications team. After the death of his first wife in 2009, he remarried Lynn Worthington, who has been instrumental with stewardship and communications in our fellowship. He first joined a Unitarian Universalist Church in Asheville, NC in 1974. He has a daughter in the United Kingdom and a son in Sarasota as well as three step-sons in Florida and Hawaii. He enjoys spinning classes and duplicate bridge as well as cycling and golfing on executive golf courses. In preparing this message for today he read four books and conferred with many UUs and several Buddhists.

                 


Doug addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning




09/11/16 It is a Unitarian Universalist tradition to have an annual Water Ceremony in the fall. Participants brought to the service a small amount of water, or symbolic water, from a place that is special to them. During the appointed time in the service, people one by one poured their water into a large bowl. As the water is added, the person who brought it said why this water is special. The combined water is symbolic of our shared faith coming from many different sources. The UU Water Service represents many rivers flowing into a sea, symbolizing that we are more than the sum of our parts; we are stronger together; we can do together what we cannot do alone. The New River Strings Dulcimer Players provided music throughout the service.


Cheryl Black of The New River Strings Dulcimer Players

The New River Strings Dulcimer Players, a local dulcimer group, started eight years ago when Linda Myers invited Don Pedi, a professional dulcimer musician, to give a concert and a workshop. Attendees "came out of the wood work" and finding each other, decided to form a group. Nancy Turner and Betty Musick, former members of NCUU, were key founding members. Eventually the remaining exceptional players became a performing subgroup, The New River Strings Dulcimer Players, providing our music today.









   

09/04/16



NCUU Players



In Their Own Words


NCUU’s service on September 4th honored the American workforce by reflecting on the meaning and significance of the holiday and its history. With words and music from America’s unions we traced the on- going story of labor’s determination, strife, pride in hard work and the Unitarian Universalists’ part in the story.

Several members of the locally-renowned NCUU Players presented today’s service. The NCUU Players is a fun group of members who regularly contribute their performing talents to spice up NCUU services. We all had fun and learned something new!

Our NCUU Players addressed the first of our Unitarian Universalist principles: We value the inherent worth and dignity of every person.





08/28/16

Rev. Mark Spivey:
In the Eye of the Storm: How to confront chaos with a sense of C.A.L.M.

The presentation today surveyed the "stormy" and often unpredictable nature of life in the 21st century. Our speaker offered a four-step method for remaining calm and confident in the midst of the chaos in our lives and in our communities.

Mark is a seminary-prepared, ordained minister and a licensed professional clinical counselor. Mark holds master’s degrees in the fields of theology, philosophy and clinical social work. This combination of education and training enables him to provide effective psychosocial and spiritual counseling and support. Mark has more than 30 years of experience in coaching people through life's problems, unexpected changes and the losses that bring tough times. He specializes in problems associated with chronic and/or terminal disease, death/dying, grief and bereavement, caregiver issues, difficulties in decision-making, adjustment disorders, depression, anxiety, spiritual distress/disorders, moral and ethical distress, dealing with the loss of independence, quality of life changes associated with traumatic injury, chronic pain issues, relationship challenges, and managing stress, compassion fatigue and burn-out associated with the home and/or work environment.


Rev. Spivey addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




08/21/16

Members of NCUU & Friends: Annual Poetry Service

Members and friends of the congregation read original and other inspiring poems. 

Today’s service addressed several of our Unitarian Universalist principles, depending on what poems our speakers select to read.






08/14/16


Rev. Dr. Sara Zimmerman

Zen and
the Art of Letting Go

Recently when the UK voted to leave the European Union, stocks plummeted and retirement funds suddenly seemed to be in jeopardy. Things have eased since then, thank goodness, but what better time to consider the Buddhist sacred scriptures, the Heart Sutra, and the Vimalakirti Sutra, and the subject of letting go, of being "non-attached" in the Buddhist sense. Understanding the riddle-filled Buddhist texts is eased through inclusion of close parallels to the more familiar message in I Corinthians 13 that "the greatest of these is love."

Sara retired from full-time parish ministry in 2013 as settled minister at UU Church of Tampa. Before that, she also served the UU Fellowship of Charlotte County, FL. She is currently active in the Florida UU Ministers Association and does a fair amount of guest preaching all around Florida. Before going to seminary in 1998, Sara had a long career teaching English and comparative literature at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee. She recently returned from a trip back to Milwaukee to visit with her grandchildren, Henry, age 12, and Helen, 9.

Rev. Dr. Sara Zimmerman will address the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




08/07/16

Dr. Stephen Mulkey

Finding meaning in the era of profound ecological change



Dr. Stephen Mulkey:  Finding meaning in the era of profound ecological change

Human caused climate change is an existential challenge to civilization and a threat to the dynamic stability of the biosphere. Climate disruption raises issues of the role of science in a democracy, global and local social justice, and the nature-human duality inherent in our dominance of other living things. Our emissions trajectory is catastrophic for our children and their descendants, and it is doubtful that a reasoned response will be timely to avoid global average 2˚C warming. This is an opportunity to transform civilization to a more sustainable basis and to implement global scale management of the biosphere. At the heart of our response will be our willingness to cultivate a deep respect for the limits of nature, each other, and other living things. The spiritual principles of humility and compassion can guide us to a deeper understanding of human meaning.

Stephen Mulkey is an environmental scientist dedicated to developing undergraduate and graduate programming to build society’s capacity for environmental mitigation, adaptation, and resilience. Mulkey was the president of Unity College in Unity, Maine from 2011 through 2015. His leadership and forward-looking vision resulted in Unity College being the first college in the U.S. to divest its endowment from the top 200 fossil fuel companies, and the first college in the U.S. to adopt sustainability science as the framework for all academic programming. Mulkey believes that higher education has an ethical obligation to prepare generations of graduates for the extreme sustainability and climate change challenges of this century. He received his PhD at the University of Pennsylvania and spent over twenty years as a forest ecologist affiliated with the Smithsonian. Mulkey has served as tenured faculty at three doctoral granting universities. His spiritual practice includes daily meditation and dedication to seeking a higher purpose through service and understanding nature.

Dr. Stephen Mulkey addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




07/31/16

Rev Herbert Agee: The Best You Can Be

Today’s sermon concerned being the best person we can be. Rev Agee examined the context of who we are and what "best" means for each of us.

Chaplain Herb Agee studied at Trevecca Nazarene University and Nazarene Theological Seminary. He pastored in Stuart, FL and then became a police officer and police chaplain and EMT on the police ambulance in Stuart. He pastored in Lakeland, FL where he also trained in hospital chaplaincy at Tampa General Hospital. He then was a full time hospital chaplain at Wuesthoff Hospital in Rockledge, FL. While there he assisted a friend in a United Methodist Church. They moved to Englewood United Methodist church, where Herb was assistant pastor and ran a motorcycle ministry from the local biker bars. Three years ago, he and his wife moved to Ocala to work for Hospice of Marion County, where he serves as a chaplain and bereavement specialist and his wife, Dr. Carmel Quigley, is the medical director at Legacy House.

Rev Agee’s sermon addressed our first Unitarian Universalist principle:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person







07/24/16

Bert Gagnon


What Is Humanism?





Today’s speaker presented a reading of a paper by renowned Humanist, Fred Edwords, who clarifies the meaning of Humanism by separating and defining the varied types of Humanism. Edwords focuses on the differences and similarities between Secular Humanism and Religious Humanism.

Fred Edwords is the director of planned giving for the American Humanist Association (AHA) and the Humanist Institution. He has a long history of involvement with the AHA and free-thinker groups and causes. He has done extensive lecturing, writing, debating, and teaching on human rights, humanist philosophical issues and effective outreach techniques for organizations in the community of reason. Edwords has appeared on national and local television in the US and Canada and has been interviewed for radio and print media around the world as well as written for several publications.

Bert Gagnon is a member of our congregation, Vice President of NCUU and Vice President of the Humanists of North Central Florida.

Fred Edwords’ words relate to the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning

As a special addition to today's’ service we will have a

UU Child Dedication

 






07/17/16

The faith world is increasingly multifaith. People are crossing borders of religion and spiritual practice to create wholeness in their lives individually and collectively. The labels - Christian, Jew, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu, theist and non-theist - no longer define who or what we love, or how spirit moves in our lives. General Assembly 2016 in Columbus Ohio assembles leaders and communities of many faiths to worship together, learn from one another, and create a new vision of faith that no longer divides us, but connects us to an interdependent future that works for all. Two members of NCUU who served as our delegates will present highlights. 

General Assembly (GA) is the annual meeting of our Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA). Attendees worship, witness, learn, connect, and make policy for the Association through democratic process. Anyone may attend; congregations must certify annually to send voting delegates. 

Linda Myers has been a member of NCUU for ten years. She has served NCUU as vice president, president, nominating committee member, Sunday service speaker and Sunday service leader. This was her first time to attend GA and she is honored to have represented NCUU as a delegate.

Linda addressed all of our Unitarian Universalist principles.




0710/16


UU Rev Dr. Maureen Killoran


What Do Evangelicals Have that We Don't?



We came prepared to be ticked and provoked, as UU Rev. Dr. Maureen Killoran shared her perspective on a group about which Unitarian Universalists often have little good to say.

Rev. Dr. Maureen Killoran is an accredited interim minister who, over the past decade, has helped seven congregations in five states as they navigated conflicts and came to embrace change. Before that Rev. Maureen served as parish minister in Oregon and North Carolina, two congregations that each doubled in size during her ministry. In addition, during a period when she worked as a community minister, she developed a practice in spiritually-based life coaching. Rev. Maureen currently serves as developmental minister at the UU Fellowship of Gainesville. She holds master’s degrees in sociology and divinity and a Doctor of Ministry in church organizational systems. Rev. Maureen shares her life with her spouse, Peter Hyatt, a lifelong UU and active volunteer.

Rev. Maureen’s sermon addressed our fourth Unitarian Universalist principle:

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning







07/03/16

Ashley Rhodes-Courter

Three Little Words



After spending almost ten years in the foster care system, Ashley was finally adopted from a group home when she was twelve. Instead of seeing herself as a victim, Ashley has used her experience to find the strength to accomplish incredible things. She became a New York Times Bestselling author by age 22, holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work, ran for Florida State Senate at age 26, created and heads a non-profit organization, and she has been a foster parent to more than 20 children. In this inspiring sermon, Ashley showed us how to overcome our own personal and professional challenges to accomplish more than we ever thought possible. She delivered her story with humor and grace, and attendees felt energized and ready to take on the world!

Ashley Rhodes-Courter is the quintessential American success story. Born in 1985 to a single teen mother, by the age of 3 she was in Florida’s foster care system where she spent almost ten years being shuttled between 14 homes—some quite abusive—before being adopted from a Children’s Home at the age of twelve. Despite her ordeal, she excelled in school because she believed that, “my education was the one thing nobody could take from me.” Early in her life she felt compelled to advocate for herself and the other children she lived with, particularly in the abusive foster homes. Her efforts and academic achievements landed her Eckerd College’s Trustee Scholarship—the school’s most prestigious full-tuition award. She graduated with honors and ahead of schedule earning a double major in Communications and Theater and a double minor in Political Science and Psychology. Ashley then went on to earn a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Southern California.

Ashley addressed our first Unitarian Universalist principle:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person




06/26/16

Dan Gribbin: What Constitutes Our Community? 

Recent events have shown that, even in the 21st century in America, our sense of shared values can erode to the point that there is little common ground for a community in crisis to rally around. What are the forces that can cause this sort of decline in our sense of a shared journey? What can be done to promote a sense of community? These are the questions that have motivated a remarkable researcher named Robert Putnam to survey all sorts of communities to understand the root causes of the decline of community in America. His most famous book is "Bowling Alone," published in 2001. And in March 2015, he published "Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis," offering advice about how to turn the tide in this battle. It’s a timely subject, and Dan is excited about the opportunity to promote discussion on these issues.




Dan Gribbin has retired from college teaching after 37 years. He spent the bulk of his career as Prof. of English at Ferrum College in Virginia, teaching writing, film, and a variety of literature courses. During the past decade, he has taught African-American Literature and American Literature at the University of Central Florida. He and his wife Martha live in Daytona Beach Shores and are members of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Ormond Beach, where he serves as co-chair of the Worship Committee.

Shore bird photography, songwriting, and grand parenting are Dan's most important retirement activities, not necessarily in that order.




                

Dan addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all





06/19/16

Sally Smith-Adams
NCUU Choir


Let the Music Be Your Guide


Music can be used to express and enhance our UU principles in a very unique way because it reaches us intellectually, emotionally and spiritually. Music is an integral part of our spiritual/religious experience. Therefore, there will not be a great deal of talk this morning; instead we will let the music do the “talking”. Each musical selection has been chosen with one or more of our UU principles in mind.

Our NCUU musical presence/ensemble has been slowly, but surely growing for the past few years. Some of us are and have worked professionally in the music field. Some of us have long been active in community choruses, group church choirs, drum circles, dulcimer groups, or community theater groups. Some of us always loved music, but weren't able to participate due to demands of working full-time and raising a family. We are now able to participate in NCUU musical selections.

We have a dedicated core group who come on Sunday mornings at 9:00 a.m. October thru June for Choir practice. We try to present music for Sunday Service as often as possible. We have received positive feedback from our congregation about how music enhances our Sunday Services. We also are fortunate to have three pianists so that we do not need to sing hymns to CDs anymore. We also have a fine guitarist who has been very instrumental in improving our sound system.






06/12/16

UU Intern Minister

Tracie Barrett-Welser:

Getting There

06/12/16

In the middle of every journey there comes a moment when you can no longer see where you came from and you can't quite see where you're going. How do we keep pushing through to continue on the journey?


Tracie Barrett-Welser lives in Winter Haven with her husband and teenage stepson. She has officially been a Unitarian Universalist for over five years, but decided she's held the same beliefs for most of her life. She considers herself a UU evangelist, wanting to spread the "good news" of our liberal and welcoming faith. She is in her third year of seminary at Meadville Lombard Theological School in Chicago and is the ministerial intern at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Marion County.


Tracie Barrett-Welser addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning




06/05/16

Joe Wetzel: The Miracle of Language

Humanity as we know it could not exist without language. There were once lots more than the thousands of languages we have today. But no one knows where, when or by whom they began. To study languages, is to a remarkable degree, to study human nature. We shall examine how the newly discovered "nature" of languages relates in sometimes surprising ways to our language use and learning experience as well as our affinity to the rest of humanity.


A life-long student with very eclectic tastes, after serving in the Air Force, Joe went to graduate school on a three-year fellowship to study linguistics. He is reasonably fluent in five languages, but has dabbled in many more, and he has studied how various kinds of languages work, as well as how they evolve. 

Joe became a UU while in graduate school and he feels that he brings his faith to bear on most things he studies. When he speaks here at NCUU he tries to tie his theme to that point of view and definitely not just relate information for its own sake. His idea is that if anything is sacred, our time together on Sunday morning certainly is. Sacred, of course, does not necessarily mean solemn; for in keeping with what Horace said many centuries ago about literature, his talk should be "dulce et utlie".




Our friend Joe addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




05/29/16

Tom Hibberd: Humans, animals, trees, thinking machines, and Teddy bears: Who is conscious?

A couple of years ago Tom shared some thoughts about objective reality and free will. This was a sequel to that presentation, especially considering questions about consciousness vs. objective reality.

Dr. Tom Hibberd is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Inverness. In 1965 he attended Reed College in Portland Oregon with the somewhat grandiose goal of “finding out what is real.” He feels that the philosophical understanding he gained then has been invaluable in his thirty-five years of clinical practice. Today he wishes to share some of those insights, as well as other things he thinks he has figured out since then.

Tom addressed all of our Unitarian Universalist principles.










05/22/16


Rodney Cole


And I blessed them unaware


05/22/16

Without the assistance of a faith that leaves your fate to a divine judgment that assigns you to Heaven or Hell where can a Unitarian turn to find a sense of afterlife? Is there one?

In searching through his literary background our speaker found clues which he shared. A few lapped into Biblical material; most did not.

Although raised as a Christian Scientist, Rod Cole became involved with Unitarianism the second meeting of this congregation back in 1998. Since then he has served NCUU on the Board and as the 6th President, 2008-2010. He has a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science from Kansas State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. All degrees are in various aspects of Human Communication. The Master's and Doctoral degrees include minors in English Literature and Dramatic Theory and Criticism. After a career as a college Professor he is now Professor Emeritus at the University of Maine in Augusta.

Rod addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




05/15/16

Rev Scott Traxler: Close Encounter of the 3-D Kind

As human consciousness evolved, our senses became amplified through invention, innovation, and technology. We can see to the very edges of the universe and confirm the minutest of quantum particles. The drive to improve our mental capabilities of logic, reasoning, and scientific exploration has dominated all facets of life, including our spiritual lives, and in that process we may be missing a profound way of experiencing the very mysteries of life we so wish to understand and embrace.

Scott was ordained in Interfaith Ministry at this past year's Parliament of World Religions held in the hometown of his youth, Salt Lake City. Major milestones on his journey include Doctorate and Master’s Degrees in Divinity, Counseling, and the Humanities. Along the way he also graduated from the Humanist Institute's three-year long curriculum. As a Professor, Scott focused on leadership development and small group dynamics, subjects which later found expression in his Master of Divinity thesis, "Creating Sacred Circles." He and his wife, Ruh, have been delegates on several occasions to the UU General Assembly. They make their home in Ocala, Florida where Scott is a spiritual support volunteer for Hospice.

Rev Scott addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning

7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part







05/08/16



UU Rev Carole Yorke





           

Blessing? What's a blessing? We bless things that are very important to us. "We praise the Creation--love it fiercely, worship it well." Many brought their pets or pictures of pets to have them blessed. Rev Yorke also shared how well-meaning owners may unwittingly be causing harm to the animals they consider family. Click here to read the NY Times article, “Is Your Pet Lonely and Bored?” that she mentioned in her sermon.


Rev Carole Yorke is a frequent, much loved visitor to our pulpit. She has been a Unitarian Universalist minister in Florida since 1998. She has served the Spirit of Life UUs, UU Church in Stuart, and First UU Congregation of the Palm Beaches, but is now retired in Port St Lucie where she lives with her five beautiful Pomeranians. She loves coming to visit with Nature Coast UUs. An added activity in the gym recently has been cardio-boxing, a great workout!


Rev Carole addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part









05/01/16

Kurtland Davies: Navigating the Maze of Elderhood

All your adult life, you worked hard, raised children, and cared for your spouse, and then your parents. You bought a house and all the stuff that goes with it to keep up with your neighbors. You followed the rules, did what your boss demanded, and listened to your family, your teachers, your church leaders and maybe even political leaders. Could it be different now? Yes, it could be completely different! It is time for you to listen to and take care of yourself. It is never too late to be who we want to be: to heal old hurts; to learn new things; to live in the present moment; to have fun, and enjoy life; to nurture friendships; to forgive, especially ourselves; to be of service the way we choose; and to trust the wisdom that is inside of us.




Kurtland Davies has two Master's Degrees in Psychology and Counseling and a PhD in eco-psychology, but everything he really needs to know, he found in nature. Kurtland had a long career in counseling, therapy, and education and spend the last 26 years giving presentations and workshop topics as varied as Healing your Inner Child, Dreamwork, Reconnecting with Nature, We all Have Many Names, We are not Broken, Eco-Psychology and Alternative Energy. Kurtland is a natural born story teller and especially loves "children's books" that have important lessons for adults!

Kurtland is an ardent supporter of UU principles and practices, especially in the areas of social justice, searching for our own truth and green sanctuary. He and his wife Gaia have been members of the UU in Ormond Beach for 15 years and also spend time in the Northwest, where they attend a UU church in Vancouver, WA.

Kurtland addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person

3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning

6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all






04/24/16


UU Rev Bob Murphy


Climate Change
and
Environmental Justice




Rev Murphy presented an introduction to the environmental justice concept with special emphasis on climate change. He also addressed the Unitarian Universalist Association Green Sanctuary program.

Bob Murphy is an unusual minister. He has received the Special Service Award from the national Sierra Club because of his human rights work. He has received environmental awards from the NAACP and the Red Cross. Bob helped to establish the UUA Green Sanctuary program. He is the new Unitarian Universalist minister in Tarpon Springs and will address ALL of our Unitarian Universalist principles.






04/17/16

Earth-centered Small Group Ministry:  Flower Service

As we celebrate the greening of the earth and the Unitarian Universalist Flower Communion we contemplate that we are made from this earth, our dreams are made from this earth and all that we know speaks to us through this earth. We who are both spirit and matter here on this earth discover ourselves-no greater of lesser than anything around us but part of the whole. In this we find that we have a purpose and a place within the unfolding process of Nature symbolized by the unfolding of the flowers.




The UU Flower Service addressed our sixth Unitarian Universalist principle:

We covenant to affirm and promote the goal of world community with peace, liberty and justice for all.




04/10/16

We had an abbreviated morning service pertaining to the spiritual practice of the democratic governance of our church which was then followed by the annual NCUU business meeting.




Todays' meeting addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person

2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations

3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations

5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large




04/03/16

Peter Freeman: The State of the World

The world is better than it has ever been and is getting better at an ever increasing rate. Today’s speaker shared irrefutable evidence in support of this proposition. The prevailing pessimism, that is almost universally held, is getting in the way of further progress.




               
Peter addressed ALL of our Unitarian Universalist principles.



03/27/16: UU Rev Carole Yorke: Called Back to Life: an Easter Sermon

Easter Sunday is a confusing day. Theologically speaking, Easter can be a very confusing day. It's a day which follows on death, and yet, celebrates the amazing, mysterious, eternal spirit of life. I was raised with a simple Baptist message: "He is Risen!" That's how the greeters welcomed us to the service on Easter. We had balloons and music - a real celebration. It was almost too cold in NJ at Easter to focus on and attribute our joy to spring flowers or green grass; no, we celebrated the mysterious rising of life from death...with three simple words: "He is Risen!" What does this possibly have to do with my life as a Unitarian Universalist?

Rev Carole Yorke has been a Unitarian Universalist minister in Florida since 1998. She has served the Spirit of Life UUs, UU Church in Stuart, and First UU Congregation of the Palm Beaches, but is now retired in Port St Lucie where she lives with her five beautiful Pomeranians. She loves coming to visit with Nature Coast UUs. An added activity in the gym recently has been cardio-boxing, a great workout!


Rev Carole's sermon addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part






03/20/16

Hassan Shibly

 Islamophobia
and
Religious Freedom

“When we understand one another, by nature, we will also respect and love each other. It is my vision that any community where all cultures are understood and respected will be beacon of hope for the world." - Hassan Shibly

 

We were honored and inspired today to have as our pulpit guest Hassan Shibly.

A lawyer, speaker, and teacher, Mr. Shibly has dedicated his life to fostering a healthy cohesive relationship between American Muslims and society at large. He has taught courses on Islamic belief, law, history, spirituality and culture and serves as a consultant on Islam for non-governmental organizations, non-profit organizations, government agencies, media organizations, youth groups, and law enforcement. He lives with his wife and three children in the Tampa area, where among his other activities he serves as executive director of the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR).

His talk today addressed all of our Unitarian Universalist principles.

You can follow him at his official blog at www.hassanshibly.com


www.cairflorida.org








03/13/16

Rev Kalen Fristad

Universalism:

Past, Present and Powerful



In addition to speaking on the long rich history of universalism, today’s speaker  related that the teaching of eternal damnation is not merely a harmless untruth that we might appropriately ignore and allow to stand, but it has serious consequences. It leads to the possibility, perhaps even the inevitability, of wars, bigotry, oppression and abuse. On the other hand, the teaching of universalism leads to equality, respect, love and dignity for all.


Rev Kalen Fristad has written a book on universalism, entitled Destined for Salvation: God’s Promise to Save Everyone, and a Study Book with the same title. Kalen addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations congregations and in society at large
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all




03/07/16

Ginny Fitzgerald: Reproductive Justice


Ginny Fitzgerald, a member of NCUU, read Amy Carol Webb's sermon today.
The Reverend Amy Carol Webb’s sermon, “Body and Soul: Reproductive Justice - No Easy Answers” was selected by the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) Commission on Social Witness (CSW) as the Social Witness Sermon for General Assembly 2014. Sponsored by the CSW and the Unitarian Universalist Minister’s Association, the contest was open to both clergy and laypeople to speak out on any dimension of the 2012-2014 Congregational Study/Action Issue, “Reproductive Justice: Expanding Our Social Justice Calling.” Rev. Webb preached this sermon at the 2014 UUA General Assembly in Providence, Rhode Island. 



UU Rev Amy Carol Webb



02/28/16

Elaine Silver: Spirituality and The Beatles

A Trans-denominational minister, as well as life-long fan and student of The Beatles, Rev. Elaine shared her spiritual interpretations of some of the songs of the Four Lads. These included history of the music and audience participation.




Rev. Faerie Elaine Silver  addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part









02/21/16

 

UU Rev Katy Korb

 

A Basic Necessity




TIME TO BE BRAVE

At a time when fear is rampant and physical security is sought at any cost, the need for courage is clear. To lose it is to lose our full humanity.

Rev. Kathleen Korb was born and raised in St. Petersburg, FL and attended Stetson University in DeLand, majoring in English and minoring in mathematics and education. She graduated from Harvard Divinity School and was ordained in Sharon, MA in 1979. She has served churches in New London, CT, Farmington Hills, MI, New Orleans, LA, Naples, FL and St. Petersburg where she retired in 2014. 




02/14/16

Annie Bumgarner: The Power of Tenderness


How can we stay awake to our natural state of tenderness and compassion? Focus on what is important; life is unbelievably short.


Annie is the life enrichment consultant at Cedar Creek ALF, Crystal River. She is a Therapeutic Recreation Specialist and has led numerous workshops. She is in the process of learning NVC, Non-violent Communication to help teach a language of love and compassion. She successfully completed the Leadership Program in Spiritual Education and Enrichment at Unity Village, Kansas City, Kansas, addressing the significance of our spiritual journey. Currently she is the Licensed Unity Teacher at Unity of Citrus, Lecanto. In addition she is an owner of an import company with her husband. She thrives on learning and believes that wellness and spiritual growth is a lifelong process of choices and renewal that creates quality of living. You can view  any lessons that Annie has given on www.unityofcitrus.org



Annie’s presentation addressed ALL of our Unitarian Universalist principles.



02/07/16

Bill & Eli Perras: Black History Month - Song and Story


Today’s service was a song and story presentation that shared artifacts of notable civil rights icons: Dr. Carter G. Woodson, the Tuskegee Airmen, Harry T. Moore, Martin Luther King Jr. and other influential people leading up to the civil rights movement.


The many inspired lyrics given to and interpreted by Eli, combined with Bill's bluesy finger-style guitar playing create a very uniquely modern take on true Americana music in its purest form. Receiving much recognition for their tightly woven musical creativity, they humbly remain true to their personal values. They speak out with strong heartfelt lyrics accompanied by soulful genuine pentatonic rhythms against social injustices, corporate greed, and daily follies in everyday life. They can grip your heart, search your soul, change a mindset, or softly strike a funny bone, all the while leaving the audience with a sentiment for the common good we desire in all mankind. Bill & Eli have opened or shared the stage with many nationally recognized entertainers. They are regulars at many Florida folk music venues/festivals and frequently travel beyond the Sunshine State, sharing their inspiring music.



Bill & Ellie addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person

2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations

4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning

6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all

7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




01/31/16

UU Rev Mary Louise DeWolf: Morality and Freedom

If morality means conforming to a standard of right and good, and freedom means a lack of restraint, what is the relationship between morality and freedom? How do we live in a society that values both?






                 
The Reverend Mary Louise DeWolf is a second generation native Floridian. After receiving her BS in Science Education and Master of Education from the University of Florida, she spent thirty-three years teaching biology and chemistry in the public schools of Florida, Georgia, California, England and the Florida Community College in Jacksonville. This was followed by eight years as a Co-District Executive in the Florida and Mid-South Districts of the Unitarian Universalist Association. During this time Rev. DeWolf began her preparation for ministry. She later received a MA in Religious Studies at the University of South Florida and Final Fellowship from the Unitarian Universalist Association. She served as part-time minister at Nature Coast Unitarian Universalists in Citrus Springs, Florida for seven years, retired from ministry in 2010, and was awarded Minister Emerita.


Rev DeWolf addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large




01/24/16

Yvette Gibbs-Mitchell: Pursuing Liberty in the Face of Injustice: Uniting all Americans as advocates for civil and human rights

Today’s presentation focused on how we can collaborate through our faith-based initiative to address the issues affecting all Americans, especially Floridians, in the following areas: restoration of rights, voting equality (removing barriers that impede the vote), criminal justice and juvenile justice reform (passage of key ballot initiatives that will reduce incarceration), and Get-out-the-Vote efforts. The speakers provided an overview of the NAACP in the State of Florida and how we can work together to address pertinent issues. Accompanying today’s main speaker was Sannye Jones, State Youth Advisor, Pat Spencer, Area IX Director and Membership Chair, and Don Brown, 1st Vice President of the Florida State Conference NAACP.


Yvette Gibbs-Mitchell (Facebook Page) currently serves as the State Secretary of the Florida State Conference NAACP and the Youth Advisor of the Marion County Youth Council (Facebook Page). She is a life member of the NAACP and has worked tirelessly for more than a decade to not only challenge youth to become active citizens in their community, but also to assist more than 67 units in the State of Florida in being stalwart advocates for justice and equality in their communities. She is a wife and mother of three. Her son, Brendien Jr, serves as a NAACP National Board Member and President of the Florida State Conference Youth and College Division. Their home is an NAACP house as every member is currently serving in some capacity either at the local, state, or national level.




Today’s presentation addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:

1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large
6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part








01/17/16

Kathryn Taubert
 
Better To Have Loved


Speaker and Audience Reflections upon Love, Loss and Renewal

 




01/17/16

Better To Have Loved is a love story, an illustration of what caregivers of the desperately ill endure, and a testimonial to the power of determination in surviving bereavement. For anyone who ever asked themselves why and how to go on, this program is for you.


Kathryn Taubert will describe in exquisite, sometimes painful detail, her experience of rebuilding her life after being widowed twice in less than 20 years. Taubert’s experience managing the overwhelming mass of medical information to help her critically ill husband amid fears of yet another loss are merely a prelude to what comes next. Her story is one of hope for anyone facing the serious illness or death of a loved one, and an affirmation of those who already have. Drawing the reader in like a best-selling page-turner, Taubert’s story makes the reader want to know what happens next as soon as possible. Her life after multiple losses is as much an adventure story filled with surprise, humor and reflection as it is a primer for the grieving. The discussion that ensues makes this program a valuable resource for anyone experiencing bereavement or caring for someone who is. 

Her story offers hope and guidance for anyone starting over after the death of a spouse. From a business career to devoted wife, Taubert left thriving careers for marriage and was then widowed. Twice. From the depths of despair, the now twice-widowed, retired 57-year-old widow with Tourette syndrome and a self-described “couch potato,” built a new life as an athlete, jazz recording artist, international volunteer, and successful author.


Today’s speaker addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part




01/10/16

Rev Lloyd Dunham: Is Your God Too Small? Religious Implications of Our Vastly Expanded Cosmology

Today’s speaker shared reflections on the impact of the Hubble space telescope on our understanding of the universe as it impacts our religious faith.



Rev Dunham is a retired United Church of Christ pastor. He is a Charter Member of Community Unitarian Universalist Church of New Smyrna Beach since 1997 and has served as president of Community UU. While his roots are in the Methodist Church most of his ministry has been in the United Church of Christ. On retirement in 1996 he and his wife turned to Unitarian Universalism. They have been happily UU ever since. He has served congregations in Tennessee, Ohio, New York and Massachusetts, concluding with serving as interim minister at the United Church of Christ in New Smyrna Beach.

Rev Dunham holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from West Virginia Wesleyan where he met his wife 63 years ago. He also has a Master of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt University School of Religion and a Master of Education from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He currently serves as a volunteer licensed massage therapist at Hospice of Volusia/Flagler.

Our speaker today addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part





01/03/16

Laura Pedersen

The Whole Truth


Lying is always morally wrong, according to philosopher Immanuel Kant. Yet, my Aunt Sally says white lies are okay when they spare someone’s feelings. Our relationship with the truth impacts our relationship with others, in addition to our own moral choices. On a larger scale, when our faith in the truthfulness of our leaders breaks down, society is at risk.

 Laura Pedersen is an author, playwright, and former New York Times columnist. She's a lifelong UU and currently an active member at the Unitarian Church of All Souls in Manhattan. She speaks annually at NCUU and is always well received.

 Laura addressed the following Unitarian Universalist principles:
1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person
2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations
4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning
7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part


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